The neuro-restorative effect of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on a mouse model of diabetic neuropathy


YİĞİTTÜRK G., Erbas O., KARABAY YAVAŞOĞLU N. Ü. , Açıkgöz E. , Buhur A., GÖKHAN A., ...More

NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume:
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/01616412.2021.1967679
  • Title of Journal : NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH
  • Keywords: Diabetic neuropathy, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell, schwann cell, emg, s100, cdk2, ngf, dhh, NERVE GROWTH-FACTOR, EXPRESSION, RECOVERY, HEDGEHOG

Abstract

Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common degenerative complication associated with Diabetes Mellitus. Despite widespread awareness about DN, the only effective treatments are blood glucose control and pain management. The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of intramuscular adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (AMSC) transplantation on sciatic nerves in DN using EMG and histological analyses. A total of 27 mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group, DN group and AMSC group. In EMG, CMAP amplitude in the sciatic nerves was lower, but distal latency was higher in the DN group compared with the control group. CMAP amplitude in the sciatic nerves was higher in the AMSC group compared with the DN group. Distal latency in the sciatic nerve was lower in the AMSC group compared with the DN group. Histologic examination of the tissues in the animals treated with AMSC showed a remarkable improvement in microscopic morphology. Fluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that intramuscularly transplanted AMSC was selectively localized in the sciatic nerves. Transplantation of AMSC increased protein expression of S100, cdk2, NGF and DHH, all of which, interfered with DN onset in sciatic nerves. The findings of the present study suggest that AMSC transplantation improved DN through a signal-regulatory effect on Schwann cells, neurotrophic actions and restoration of myelination.