CAHİT SITKI TARANCI HOUSE-MUSEUM (CULTURE MUSEUM)AND THE LENGERS EXISTING IN IT


Başak O.

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES IN SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE CONTEXT OF ARCHAEOLOGY, HISTORY, HISTORY OF ART, PHILOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, Nükhet Eltut Kalender, Editör, Berikan Elektronik Basım Yayın, Ankara, ss.196-218, 2020

  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Yayınevi: Berikan Elektronik Basım Yayın
  • Basıldığı Şehir: Ankara
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.196-218
  • Editörler: Nükhet Eltut Kalender, Editör

Özet

The house where Hüseyin Cahit, also known as Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı, a well-known poet, writer, and translator, was born in 1910, is located in the city center of Diyarbakır, at the quarter called Camii Kebir at Ziya Gökalp Street No.3. The building is dated to 1733 although there is a date signifying 1160 AH (1747 AD) in an inscription on the entrance door of the room called Başoda (the main room) facing the iwan  with a flat arch opening which is located in the south leaf of the southwestern corner, which is used as the winter room of the building where many inscriptions are found. In the middle of an arrangement in the sulus style composed of two rows of palmettes made from cas, al-Kalimah Tawhid ( Açıklama: C:\Users\oktay\Desktop\indir.jpg) and the date 1160 (١١٦٠) were engraved in Arabic in the inscription with two lines carved-embossed in the cartridges (Photo. 1 a, b). If the inscription in question is the inscription of construction of the building, the house must have been built in 1747, not in 1733, as asserted in the sources.

The house, which holds all the features of Diyarbakır's traditional residential architecture, is accessed through a single leaf drop arch door from a narrow street.  The house, constructed as a building with ground and one storey, made from face black basalt stone, consists of four leaves. On the ground floor of the house, which consists of 14 rooms of various sizes, there is a kitchen, a bath, a storeroom, a serdap (the basement room), and a toilet on the ground floor, a kitchen, a storeroom woodshed, a toilet, a bath, and a serdap and living units are located on the upper floor of the house. The areas of the house, which was designed as a haremlik (women's quarter) and selamlik (men's quarter), were located around the courtyard with a pool in the middle, following the climatic conditions, on the façades according to the seasons. In the building with an interior-oriented plan, the façades are facing the inner courtyard. The house, constructed in the first half of the 18th century, was later assigned to the master poet's family. The most significant place of the building, which is used as the Culture Museum today, is the large room called the headroom Başoda or mabeyn odası with a double arch spanned iwan on the second floor of the northern part, used as a summer room, where Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı opened his eyes to the world on October 2, 1910. The house, which was attained from the Tarancı family by the Ministry of Culture in 1973, was restored in 1974 and opened to visitors as Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı Culture Museum

Copper, dating back to the Neolithic Age in Anatolian geography, was utilized in the kitchen tools as in almost every aspect. Copper utensils used in kitchen, holding a high interest, was extensively used until the second half of the 20th century as it conveys heat well as well as being healthy.

Although the Anatolian mine artisans created kitchen utensils from all kinds of mines using various techniques, he preferred the copper-pots more in his daily life. Undoubtedly, the abundance of copper in the Anatolian lands and its more effortless workability, and consequently, more economic efficiency, were effective in this situation.

In current years, especially in luxury restaurants and in the kitchen of the families with a better financial situation, cooper kitchenware, which start to regain its reign, takes the first place in this museum as in many museums in Turkey. Kitchen pots, mainly shaped by forging and plastering techniques, were mostly ornamented with different motifs with scraping techniques, and their visuality was sought to be enhanced. In addition to being robust and its visual appearance, copper, a mineral that conducts heat very well, is preferred as the primary material in the manufacturing of kitchen utensils such as ewer, churn, tray, shallow frying pan with or without cover, fields, cauldron, bucket, and saucepans, coffee pot, tucker-bag, üsküre (covered bowl), badya ( a wide and shallow basin with two handles), pan, cullender, mug, samovar, teapot, and lenger.

In museums and private collections in Turkey, lengers constituting a group having the highest number among the copper kitchen utensils used in daily life were between the most favorite dishes of Anatolian cuisine until the second half of the last century. The lengers, which are the permanent service and presentation dishes of almost every house, are generally made of copper and have a flat-based, broad, and shallow-edged, circle-shaped structure. They were used for carrying and the presentation of dry dishes such as rice, stuffed vegetables (dolma), pasta, halvah rather than cooking because they are shallow. Besides having a cover or not, their size also show differences. The lengers, which are divided into three main groups as small, medium and large according to their size, do not show a significant difference in terms of shape and size, but in some regions, they are known by various names like lengeri, ilengeri, tabansira, mertebani

The house where Hüseyin Cahit, also known as Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı, a well-known poet, writer, and translator, was born in 1910, is located in the city center of Diyarbakır, at the quarter called Camii Kebir at Ziya Gökalp Street No.3. The building is dated to 1733 although there is a date signifying 1160 AH (1747 AD) in an inscription on the entrance door of the room called Başoda (the main room) facing the iwan  with a flat arch opening which is located in the south leaf of the southwestern corner, which is used as the winter room of the building where many inscriptions are found. In the middle of an arrangement in the sulus style composed of two rows of palmettes made from cas, al-Kalimah Tawhid ( Açıklama: C:\Users\oktay\Desktop\indir.jpg) and the date 1160 (١١٦٠) were engraved in Arabic in the inscription with two lines carved-embossed in the cartridges (Photo. 1 a, b). If the inscription in question is the inscription of construction of the building, the house must have been built in 1747, not in 1733, as asserted in the sources.

The house, which holds all the features of Diyarbakır's traditional residential architecture, is accessed through a single leaf drop arch door from a narrow street.  The house, constructed as a building with ground and one storey, made from face black basalt stone, consists of four leaves. On the ground floor of the house, which consists of 14 rooms of various sizes, there is a kitchen, a bath, a storeroom, a serdap (the basement room), and a toilet on the ground floor, a kitchen, a storeroom woodshed, a toilet, a bath, and a serdap and living units are located on the upper floor of the house. The areas of the house, which was designed as a haremlik (women's quarter) and selamlik (men's quarter), were located around the courtyard with a pool in the middle, following the climatic conditions, on the façades according to the seasons. In the building with an interior-oriented plan, the façades are facing the inner courtyard. The house, constructed in the first half of the 18th century, was later assigned to the master poet's family. The most significant place of the building, which is used as the Culture Museum today, is the large room called the headroom Başoda or mabeyn odası with a double arch spanned iwan on the second floor of the northern part, used as a summer room, where Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı opened his eyes to the world on October 2, 1910. The house, which was attained from the Tarancı family by the Ministry of Culture in 1973, was restored in 1974 and opened to visitors as Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı Culture Museum

Copper, dating back to the Neolithic Age in Anatolian geography, was utilized in the kitchen tools as in almost every aspect. Copper utensils used in kitchen, holding a high interest, was extensively used until the second half of the 20th century as it conveys heat well as well as being healthy.

Although the Anatolian mine artisans created kitchen utensils from all kinds of mines using various techniques, he preferred the copper-pots more in his daily life. Undoubtedly, the abundance of copper in the Anatolian lands and its more effortless workability, and consequently, more economic efficiency, were effective in this situation.

In current years, especially in luxury restaurants and in the kitchen of the families with a better financial situation, cooper kitchenware, which start to regain its reign, takes the first place in this museum as in many museums in Turkey. Kitchen pots, mainly shaped by forging and plastering techniques, were mostly ornamented with different motifs with scraping techniques, and their visuality was sought to be enhanced. In addition to being robust and its visual appearance, copper, a mineral that conducts heat very well, is preferred as the primary material in the manufacturing of kitchen utensils such as ewer, churn, tray, shallow frying pan with or without cover, fields, cauldron, bucket, and saucepans, coffee pot, tucker-bag, üsküre (covered bowl), badya ( a wide and shallow basin with two handles), pan, cullender, mug, samovar, teapot, and lenger.

In museums and private collections in Turkey, lengers constituting a group having the highest number among the copper kitchen utensils used in daily life were between the most favorite dishes of Anatolian cuisine until the second half of the last century. The lengers, which are the permanent service and presentation dishes of almost every house, are generally made of copper and have a flat-based, broad, and shallow-edged, circle-shaped structure. They were used for carrying and the presentation of dry dishes such as rice, stuffed vegetables (dolma), pasta, halvah rather than cooking because they are shallow. Besides having a cover or not, their size also show differences. The lengers, which are divided into three main groups as small, medium and large according to their size, do not show a significant difference in terms of shape and size, but in some regions, they are known by various names like lengeri, ilengeri, tabansira, mertebani