Occurrence ofCherry green ring mottle virusin Turkey


Sıpahıoglu H. M. , Usta M. , Ocak M.

PLANT PATHOLOGY A RECORD OF CURRENT WORK ON PLANT DISEASES AND PESTS, vol.57, pp.392, 2007 (Journal Indexed in SCI)

  • Publication Type: Article / Letter
  • Volume: 57
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Title of Journal : PLANT PATHOLOGY A RECORD OF CURRENT WORK ON PLANT DISEASES AND PESTS
  • Page Numbers: pp.392

Abstract

Cherry green ring mottle virus (CGRMV) infects several Prunus species including sweet cherry (Pavium), sour cherry (Pcerasus), oriental flowering cherry (Pserrulata), peach (Ppersica) and apricot (Parmeniaca) in fruit-growing regions throughout North America and Europe (Parker et al., 1976). CGRMV, an unassigned member of the family Flexiviridae, is a flexuous filamentous plant RNA virus with a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome of approximately 8·4 kb (Zhang et al., 1998). Until recently, routine detection of CGRMV was solely based on graft assay to the woody indicator cv. Kwanzan, the only method accepted by inspection services during quarantine and certification procedures. Since commercial antisera for detection of this virus are not available, serological assays cannot be used for its detection. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test has been developed for more sensitive detection (Li & Mock, 2005).

Leaf samples were collected for the growing season 2006 from 34 sweet cherry trees originating from the eastern Anatolia region of Turkey. Total RNA was extracted from these samples using a modified protocol based on silica-capture (Foissac et al., 2001). RT-PCR detection of CGRMV was carried out according to Foissac et al. (2001) but including an additional internal control; amplifying a fragment of the chloroplast gene ribulose, 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. CGRMV was identified in 11 of the 34 sweet cherry samples, yielding a PCR product of the expected size (366 bp). The expected fragment (200 bp) of the internal PCR control was also amplified from all cherry samples analyzed.

PCR products from six cherry trees were directly sequenced (Accession Nos. EF174471, EF182749, EF182750, EF182752, EF182753, EF182754) and showed over 85% nucleotide sequence identity to sequences of other CGRMV isolates in the databases. This is the first record of the presence of CGRMV in Turkey and provides a starting point for investigation of the incidence of the virus in sweet cherry orchards of Turkey.