THE LOST FATHERS OF AġIKLAR BAYRAMI AND THE INVENTION OF THE SOLITUDE


Aykaç Ö. A.

I. INTERNATIONAL ANGLOAMERICAN CULTURAL AND LITERARY STUDIES SYMPOSIUM, Mersin, Turkey, 16 - 18 November 2022, pp.82-83

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Summary Text
  • City: Mersin
  • Country: Turkey
  • Page Numbers: pp.82-83
  • Van Yüzüncü Yıl University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

The father-son relationship has been an unageing issue since the existence of humanity and maintains its popularity even today. It is possible to read much about the father-son relationship and conflict in the most significant works of literature, mythological narratives, and religious sources. References

from the strong and authoritarian father and the rebellious and victimized child figure of Ancient Greece continue to exist in today‘s contemporary literary works. Especially in postmodern narratives, the father image has turned into an important metaphor that is discussed in many different ways and

can find a place for itself. In addition, traditional father-son relationships continue to be frequently referred to in postmodern narratives. Paul Auster and Kemal Varol, two important figures of postmodern literature that have gained great fame in different countries, have mentioned their own

fathers, not the fathers described in sacred texts or mythology. Not only did they deal with the important aspects of the period and society in which they lived, with fictional texts, but the two authors also wrote remarkable works as names that reflect their relationship with their fathers in all

their positive and negative aspects. Both writers made an impact and attracted attention with their fiction and autobiographical works about their fathers. Paul Auster, who is defined as the most important Postmodern writer known worldwide, and Kemal Varol, one of the most talked-about

writers in Turkey in recent times, are discussed in this study with their writings after the deceased fathers. In this study, a journey has been made through the writings of both authors after the death of their fathers. It was tried to be read through Auster's memoirs and Varol's physical journey. Moreover, father-son relationships were tried to be discussed through these narratives they wrote.